Here from training in Yavoriv in September 2021 where NATO training often took place. Forum: REUTERS / Gleb Garanich / NTB

Resett.no - Of Helge Lurås-April 15, 2022 | 20:03

Obstructing Ukraine's NATO membership has been one of Putin's stated goals. An article in the Wall Street Journal now reveals how tightly integrated Ukraine has been with NATO since 2014.

When the Ukrainian National Guard's lieutenant Andriy Kulish goes into ambush against Russian forces, he thanks the Canadian army, writes the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) in a comprehensive article of which Resett here reproduces the main points.

The Canadians trained Lieutenant Kulish's Rapid Response Brigade last summer in urban warfare, field tactics and war medicine. The exercise in western Ukraine was one of many in recent years with troops from Canada, Britain, Romania and the California National Guard.

But this was only a small part of what the WSJ describes as "a little-published effort" from NATO countries.

The alliance's efforts are said to have "transformed Ukraine's military forces", from infantry to the Ministry of Defense and to overseers in parliament.

This training on the part of NATO is said to have been invaluable in resisting the Russian forces.ad

The training must have included at least 10,000 soldiers annually for more than eight years. With this, NATO and its members helped Ukraine shift from rigid Soviet-style command structures to Western standards where soldiers are taught to think along the way.

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In confusing Russian invaders today, Kulish says his soldiers "definitely use procedures they learned during training with NATO."

"Western aid, although never secret, was not trumpeted to avoid irritating Russia. It also remained low-key because it was a valuable source of intelligence for the United States and its allies. "Ukraine has been fighting a war with Russian-backed separatists in parts of the eastern Donbas region for years," the WSJ wrote.

Ukraine thus has Europe's most war-experienced soldiers. Their experience has again been useful lessons learned back in the NATO system about the Russian forces.

When Russia invaded on February 24, the training of Ukrainian forces had become so extensive that although at least eight NATO countries participated, much of the practical training was performed by Ukrainian instructors. For NATO commanders, it was a sign that Ukraine had internalized their lessons.

The lesson is that support and help over many years had a significant impact, says NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg.

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg. Photo: Francisco Seco / AP / NTB

NATO's efforts in Ukraine have been more successful than comparable Western efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Experts involved believe this is due to Ukraine's "relatively cohesive society and a recognized central government backed by bureaucracies which, although often ineffective and plagued by corruption, still embodied a unified state".

It is also mentioned that the existence of an external enemy, in Russia, has contributed to unity and motivation.

Ukraine's combat units are at the forefront of a completely rebuilt military establishment. NATO advisers brought new concepts to Ukraine's Soviet force, including military control of the military, professional inspectors, external auditors and logistics specialists.

By downplaying the importance of the number of soldiers and weapons, NATO advisers introduced the concept of capacity building, in which officers set goals and ensure that they have the troops and weapons needed to achieve them.

To advance the approach, NATO introduced the idea of ​​non-commissioned officers: Experienced soldiers who serve as important links between top commanders and ground troops. NATO countries also helped Ukrainian military leaders adopt an approach called mission command, in which senior officers set combat targets and delegate decision-making as far down the chain of command as possible, even to individual soldiers.

In the Soviet approach, still widely used by Russia, senior officers give orders that infantry have little room to discuss or adapt.

Lieutenant Kulish says the training is doubly effective because Ukrainians are familiar with Soviet military thinking.

"The Russians use their typical tactics, which have not changed much since Stalin's time," he says. First comes artillery salvos. "Then they throw lots of meat to take our positions," he said, referring to Russian soldiers. Ukrainians, on the other hand, are unpredictable and agile. "We bring chaos to their ranks," he says.

Plans by NATO began as early as 2008. The Alliance drew up a 70-page action plan outlining "Ukraine's strategic course for Euro-Atlantic integration", essentially a roadmap for Kyiv to meet NATO's democratic standards, including a more professional, civilian-controlled military.

But the project did not gain momentum until 2014.

Then-President Petro Poroshenko ordered a military transformation, which gave energy to NATO operations. Western officers turned their attention to a 150-square-kilometer military training facility in the town of Yavoriv, ​​just east of Ukraine's border with Poland.

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko and challenger Volodymyr Zelensky met during the 2019 election campaign. Photo: Vadim Ghirda / AP / NTB scanpix

The first priority in 2014 was to help Ukrainian troops fight against Russian-backed separatists in the east. NATO launched courses in war medicine, civil contingency planning and the fight against Russian hybrid warfare, from drones to telephone hacking. Western officers began teasing Ukrainian National Guard troops in modern combat tactics.

In Kyiv, the authorities worked with NATO advisers to prepare for deeper change. Advisers from the United States, Britain and other NATO countries explained that in order to make Ukraine's military more effective, the entire leadership had to change.

Soldiers who rotated out of combat in the Donbas could also use their experience in exercises and often shared lessons with their mentors. Retired U.S. Army Major General Timothy McGuire, who helped establish the Yavoriv Center, in 2018 invited Ukrainian officers to observe major NATO exercises in Germany, where they saw a unit prepare for a defensive position.

"I would not do it that way," a Ukrainian general commented to General McGuire, noting that the troops were not properly camouflaged, well-dispersed or sufficiently buried.

Ukrainian troops who used Western weapons to fight in the Donbas would also report back on their achievements and how soldiers integrated the weapons into combat.

"It was definitely a two-way street," said a NATO colonel. "Without a doubt, we learned from them while they learned from us."

As threats from Russia increased last year, the pace of military training increased. The British Army Major Bill Ross, who was in charge of British land-based training in Ukraine from October 2021 to February 2022, rushed to make Ukrainian troops comfortable using the NLAW anti-tank missiles sent over by Britain. A British infantry battalion that originally planned to instruct the troops of 40 Ukrainians suddenly had groups of 80, with soldiers coming from all over the country.

"We literally delivered these every three or four days, a new course, another course, another course," says Maj Ross.

The hope, he says, was that even if only a few hundred soldiers were trained directly, they could continue the training of other troops. At weekly coordination meetings in Kyiv, led by a US colonel, the Ukrainians and Western allies focused on training.

When Ross arrived at the Zhytomyr Military Institute southwest of Kyiv in October, he was initially denied access because of "a person in their organization who did not want interference from Western troops," he said. Finally he let himself in.

Maorj Ross' team responded to Ukraine's Joint Force Command, which had mapped out a defensive plan to prevent a Russian invasion. The last thing he saw of the Ukrainian military's slides outlining strategies in February was that red arrows pointed into the country from all sides except the West. But the Ukrainians had a defensive plan.

"That was their plan," said Major Ross. "We helped."


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WHO and WHAT is behind it all ? : >

The bottom line is for the people to regain their original, moral principles, which have intentionally been watered out over the past generations by our press, TV, and other media owned by the Illuminati/Bilderberger Group, corrupting our morals by making misbehavior acceptable to our society. Only in this way shall we conquer this oncoming wave of evil.

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